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Theology

Lucid dreaming, visions, and God

So last night I had a vision…ok, not quite a vision per se, but it would not exactly be incorrect to say that it wasn’t one either. I had a lucid dream which was very enlightening. I was back in a home I grew up with in my parents bedroom, and keenly aware of my lucid state. My father, who has past on, was on the bed sitting up on the edge and I started to carry on a conversation with him.

I said “I missed you dad”.

He said “I miss you too son”.

I then asked if he has seen God.

He replied “No”.

I then asked if he has heard God.

He then laid down and replied “God doesn’t speak to anyone”.

At which point I woke up…pondering the question.

Did God not speak to anyone because he doesn’t exist? Or because he exists but just doesn’t communicate with anyone? It was an interesting question…as how would we know the difference? How could we possibly ever know the difference of God just simply not existing, as opposed to a God that just doesn’t interact with us? I don’t think we could know the difference.

Now…don’t get me wrong. I don’t believe I was actually speaking with my father….but, not going to front…it felt great to see him, even in a dream, and it was extremely lucid as I even saw the lines of age on his face…and felt his happiness to see me. However, I also realized just how impactful something like this would have been to people hundreds to thousands of years ago who wouldn’t know what a lucid dream was. To them,something like this truly would have been a vision…and/or a visitation of a deceased relative. They would have been completely convinced they experienced something “supernatural” and would not have been lying by making the claim that they had such a visitation. While I do believe they were most likely mistaken, just like I don’t believe I was actually talking to my deceased father, they aren’t lying as they relate the experience as they really did experience something…and they processed it the only way they could. Perhaps this is what happens when people claim they are visited by not just relatives who have past on, but angels, demons, aliens or even Jesus.

So be mindful of people telling you about their experiences. If someone claims that have had an experience out of the ordinary, it is quite possible that they did…but it doesn’t mean they interpreted the experience correctly. (But if we are being honest, who is to really say that they didn’t interpret it correctly? As I don’t know what metric we would use to make that judgment, it would seem to me it would be a purely subjective evaluation of the experience.) In any case, they wouldn’t be lying by claiming such an experience…any more than I am not lying by telling you all about my lucid dream last night.

-Steve McRae

2 comments
  1. Justin L. Franks

    I agree. Even regular dreams can be powerful, and easily confused for an actual supernatural experience. But when you become aware that you are dreaming, and are able to “direct” where the dream is going, it can be especially potent.

    I suffer from sleep paralysis, which can be absolutely terrifying, even when you understand what is happening. It truly feels like an evil (or even demonic) presence.

    Luckily, I can almost always use these episodes as a “launchpad” into a full-on lucid dream, which (usually) more than makes up for those moments of sheer terror beforehand. And these induced lucid dreams can often be even more exhilarating than the spontaneously-generated lucid dreams. I suspect it’s a combination of being “primed” into a state more conscious than normal sleep, and the flood of endorphins released when you are scared out of your gourd.

  2. lreadlResurrected

    I almost never remember my dreams. But I wonder if you have had this experience, which I have had on more than one occasion and which I distinctly remember.

    Have you ever died in your dream? Been killed?

    I’m not talking about dreams where you are in mortal danger and you become cognizant in your dream that you are dreaming and you alter it to avoid the death or wake yourself up, but where you face your own death and it proceeds to the point that you, in your words, Steve, “experience” your own death?

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